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Mon, Oct 19th - 5:49PM

The Coming New World Order 2

Biometrics To Be Used On IDs.



Minnesota to Use Facial Recognition Technology on IDs -- State will add biometrics component to prevent fake driver's licenses


BY BILL SALISBURY

Pioneer Press via Knight Ridder
Minnesota soon will start using biometric face scans to prevent would-be crooks — and underage wannabe smokers and drinkers — from getting fake driver's licenses from the state.

Gov. Tim Pawlenty on Thursday announced plans to add biometric facial recognition technology to driver's licenses as part of a broader effort to protect consumers from identity theft and unauthorized use of personal data. That effort will include stiffer criminal penalties for hackers and others who abuse access to personal data on computers.

"Identity theft causes great trauma, inconvenience and damage to a lot of people and families," Pawlenty said at a Capitol news conference. He said the state must do more to crack down on identity thieves and strengthen safeguards for personal information.

Driver's licenses are one of the state's most important forms of identification, he said, and biometric technology will help law enforcement officers ensure that individuals are who they say they are.

The new technology would match an individual's driver's license photo with images in the state's database.

Here's how Pawlenty's office described it: "Facial recognition technology converts an image into a mathematical computer algorithm as a basis for a positive match. It uses the structure of a person's face — such as width between the eyes, forehead depth and nose length — to assign mathematical points of reference creating a unique data file."

The face scans will enable the state to detect people attempting to obtain licenses using the same photo with multiple names and birth dates, or the same name and birth date with multiple people's photos, said state Public Safety Commissioner Michael Campion. "The technology … will create a higher level of integrity for Minnesota's driver's licenses."

Pawlenty said 13 other states use the technology, and it has proved "highly accurate."

No new photos will be needed to develop the state's face-scan file. State workers will scan photos on current driver's licenses to create the new file.

The new technology will cost about $1 to $2 per driver's license. Pawlenty said an $800,000 federal grant will offset these costs and that he will ask the 2006 Legislature to pay the rest.

Although he believes he has the power to implement the new system on his own, he said he would ask the Legislature to approve it.

For Minnesota retailers, the new technology means customers will be far less likely to try to use fake identification cards to make purchases, especially of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products, said Steve Rush, board chairman of the Minnesota Retailers Association. Businesses will not have equipment to read the face scans, however; only the state will have that ability.
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Wednesday, May 16, 2007

New Biometric Smart Cards


ActivCard, a specialist in IDentity Management software for remote access, single sign-on and digital ID card solutions, announced an expanded cooperation with its partner Precise Biometrics AB, developer and provider of world-leading and user-friendly biometric security solutions based on fingerprints, to deliver smart card-based identification (ID) badge solutions with biometric authentication. ActivCard has incorporated Precise Biometrics' technology for fingerprint matching on smart cards, "Precise Match-on-Card", to its "ActivCard Gold 2.2" software, the most successful and widely deployed smart ID card middleware platform available on the market today. By verifying the fingerprint that's on the card, the Precise Match-on-Card method guarantees that the reference biometric template (the user's identity) never leaves the card, so it is not subject to theft.


E-Smart Technologies is a leading provider of high technology security systems that can be used to combat fraud and terrorism. E-Smart products enable government agencies and commercial enterprises to continuously and securely verify, certify and manage identification and access of citizens, personnel, customers and any other persons seeking physical or logical access. E-Smart is the exclusive provider of the Biometric Verification Security System(TM) (BVS2)(TM), featuring the Super Smart Card(TM) for Asia and the US, which experts believe to be the world's only commercially available smartcard with a full on-card matching system for biometric ID verification.
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Tuesday, May 15, 2007

Electronic surveillance: it's everywhere and it's growing.

"Eye-in-the-sky" surveillance dome camera
mounted on top of a tall steel pole.

Has the demand for and use of electronic surveillance increased? The rapid changes in telecommunications technology has been accompanied by a growth in the potential intrusiveness of electronic surveillance and a steady increase in government surveillance activity. Surveillance is the monitoring of behavior of people, objects or processes within systems for conformity to expected or desired norms. Although the word surveillance literally means "watching over" the term is often used for all forms of observation or monitoring, not just visual observation. Such as the art of watching over the activities of persons or groups from a position of higher authority. Surveillance may be covert (without a persons knowledge) or overt (perhaps with frequent reminders such as "we are watching over you"). Because they're continually making new discoveries to increase the effectiveness of biometrics, rfid chips, etc., the government may soon be tracking us all.
Read the 10 Signposts of a Global Infrastructure For Mass Registration and Surveillance   A report by the International Campaign against Mass Surveillance (Pdf File)
Also read The road to a police state   A report by Michael Nield (Pdf File)
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New Rfid Technology



The VeriChip, made by Applied Digital Solutions, Inc., is an implantable RFID microchip for humans. It is about the size of a grain of rice. The chip has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and can be used to hold patient-approved health-care information. Here's a gallery of some new rfid products.
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The Future Of Biometrics

Iris scanner

The next ten years will bring major advancements in the field of biometrics -- things like reading faces, fingerprints and irises to safeguard our own security and personal information. NBC's Tom Costello reports. (Click here to watch video clip)
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Monday, May 14, 2007

Freedom To Fascism


The Real Threat of Fascism. We all should realize and be aware of the fact that the nations Germany and Italy were liberal democracies before the rise of fascism.
Adolf Hilter used the system from inside to gain power politically with the power of propaganda. He was considered a powerful speaker, so he railed against things that he knew the people feared and perceived as threats. In return, those who followed him began to treat Hitler with almost religious adoration. After Martial law was declared in Berlin, the people all over Germany turned to "Fuhrer worship" as they were caught up in the emotions of the Nazi campaign. Next came the elections of March 5, 1933, then the Nazis began a systematic takeover of the state governments throughout Germany, ending a centuries old tradition of local political independence. Armed SA and SS thugs barged into local government offices using the state of emergency decree as a pretext to throw out legitimate office holders and replace them with Nazi Reich commissioners. On March 23, the Nazi controlled Reichstag passed the "Enabling Act." This act finally established Adolph Hitler as the total Dictator of Germany. After this, the "Gleichschaltung" (Synchronizing) began – the total coordination and absorption of the entire nation under the Nazi boot.
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The headlines stated "Europe Is United Again", May 2004


10 nations in eastern Europe and Mediterranean join bloc. Europe stood proudly reunited yesterday almost six decades after it was split in two by the Cold War, as 10 nations in eastern Europe and the Mediterranean took their places in the European Union. The once-communist states of the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia officially joined the EU family. Mediterranean islands Cyprus and Malta joined them as well, rounding out what is indisputably the world’s biggest single economic bloc, and a fledgling political force, with a total population of 455 million, the EU now surpasses the United States as the world's biggest economy.
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The New World Order

 
 
Website Links:  Biometrics                              


Biometrics




Face Scan

A computer that could recognize faces as readily as people can and would make the ideal aid for spotting and tracking known terrorists and criminals on streets or in transportation stations. But face-recognition systems aren't as reliable as law-enforcement officials would like. Identix (IDNX) and other suppliers are making steady progress. Identix says that, by combining the usual face scan with an inspection of pores and wrinkles in small blocks of skin, reliability is improved by at least 25%, to better than 90%.




Iris Scan

The Eyes Have It. Probably the most foolproof biometric measure is the eye's iris. Its complex pattern of zigzagging lines and random dots is much more distinctive than the whorls of a fingerprint. In fact, because authorities in a few foreign countries are confident that iris scans can't be circumvented, they're starting to allow airlines to use iris scanning at selected airports. If people register their iris scans, they can bypass the usual security check. Currently, a person's eye must be in close to the scanner. Intelligence and law-enforcement agencies hope that some way can be found to scan irises from a distance -- or even to spot a suspect in a crowd.



Peering Beneath the Skin

Like that of a fingerprint, the pattern of blood veins in the palm is unique to every individual. Unlike a fingerprint, however, the palm has a biometric pattern that is virtually impossible to duplicate. So Fujitsu developed a palm reader that checks the blood vessels under the skin -- and people don't even have to touch the device. That alleviates concerns about hygiene, especially in hospitals, where many people touch the same biometric sensors to gain access to a room or storage cabinet.





An Overview of Biometrics


Biometrics refers to the automatic identification of a person based on his/her physiological or behavioral characteristics. This method of identification offers several advantages over traditional methods involving ID cards (tokens)  or PIN numbers (passwords) for various reasons: (i) the person to be identified is required to be physically present at the point-of-identification; (ii) identification based on biometric techniques obviates the need to remember a password or carry a token. With the increased integration of computers and Internet into our everyday lives, it is necessary to protect sensitive and personal data. By replacing PINs (or using biometrics in addition to PINs), biometric techniques can potentially prevent unauthorized access to ATMs, cellular phones, laptops, and computer networks.  Unlike biometric traits, PINs or passwords may be forgotten, and tokens like passports and driver's licenses may be forged, stolen, or lost. Thus, biometric systems are being deployed to enhance security and reduce financial fraud. Various biometric traits are being used for real-time recognition, the most popular being face, iris and fingerprint. However, there are biometric systems that are based on retinal scan, voice, signature and hand geometry.

A biometric system is essentially a pattern recognition system which recognizes a user by determining the authenticity of a specific physiological or behavioral characteristic possessed by the user. Several important issues must be considered in designing a practical biometric system. First, a user must be enrolled in the system so that his biometric template can be captured. This template is securely stored in a central database or a smart card issued to the user.  The template is retrieved when an individual needs to be identified. Depending on the context, a biometric system can operate either in a verification (authentication) or an identification mode.

Verification vs. Identification:

There are two different ways to recognize a person: verification and identification. Verification (Am I who I claim I am?) involves confirming or denying a person's claimed identity. On the other hand, in identification, the system has to recognize a person (Who am I? ) from a list of N users in the template database. Identification is a more challenging problem because it involves 1:N matching compared to 1:1 matching for verification.

Applications:

While biometric systems, particularly automatic fingerprint identification systems (AFIS), has been widely used in forensics for criminal identification, recent advancements in biometric sensors and matching algorithms have led to the deployment of biometric authentication in a large number of civilian and government applications. Biometrics is being used for physical access control, computer log-in, welfare disbursement, international border crossing and national ID cards. It can be used to verify a customer during transactions conducted via telephone and Internet (electronic commerce and electronic banking). In automobiles, biometrics is be adopted to replace keys for keyless entry and keyless ignition. Due to increased security threats, the ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) has approved the use of e-passports (passports with an embedded chip containing the holder's facial image and other traits).

Examples:












Heathrow Airport




Pay-By-Touch



Mobile Phone (Fujitsu/Authentec)





Disney World



Embedded Biometric Device






US-VISIT Program






(1) Free (Pdf) Ebook - The Mark Of The Beast         (2) David Icke - Big Brother, the Big Picture Link-(Google-Video)         (3) Free (Pdf) Ebook - The Coming New World Order        (4) Newspaper publication detailing events that may happen in our near future - The World Observer Online

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Video Surveillance Gets Smarter

Video surveillance gets smarter in Verbania, Italy

Verbania, the capital of the province of Verbano-Cusio-Ossola, Italy, was created when the towns of Intra and Pallanza merged. As one of the most idyllic and famous tourist destinations on Lake Maggiore, the town relies heavily on holidaymakers to fill its streets and generate income. To ensure the safety of visitors and citizens, the town council decided to launch a community surveillance project based on a system of network cameras.  Monitors linked to the ten Sony SSNC-RX550 network cameras are installed in the Verbania Municipal Police control room, which is currently undergoing restructuring. Even so, the system does not require the intervention of dedicated security operatives. The human element only comes into play when real-time monitoring is needed (for example during a major event), or when an automatic alarm is triggered.

The town's network cameras have been positioned so that they can monitor all arrival and escape points in every area of the town. Intelligent image analysis functions now enable allow the city to keep special areas such as no-stopping zones under control. Using these features, live images can be monitored in unattended mode until suspicious activity occurs, at which point the operator is proactively alerted to the threat by means of an appropriate alarm.


CyberExtruder Gets 2D to 3D Face Patent

CyberExtruder announced that the company had been granted a new patent on their process for creating reliable 3D models of a person’s face from a single or series of 2D images. CyberExtruder’s 2D-to-3D conversion is certainly an important innovation to the security and biometrics technology industries. Why? It enables better matching between offline photographs and surveillance video. While the matching of "watch list" images against surveillance video has traditionally achieved mixed results as a result of inadequate lighting, angle, expression, etc., this patent could signify a leap forward in terms of the quality and value of 3D facial images.

Sunday, May 24, 2009

Full Body Scanners

Security checkpoint full body scanners. The full body scanner is not new, but it is needless to say that the concept of a full body x-ray doesn't sit too well with many people. The scanners are currently being tested at 10 different US airports, but the trial only involves offering the scanner as an alternative to a pat down in a secondary security search. The obvious question is whether the scanner can see "everything", and the answer is yes - the full body scanner will see all your "parts", the TSA tries to alleviate passenger concerns by moving the screener away from the machine, hidden away in a dark room. Your face is also blurred on the display, so there is no risk of TSA agents pointing at you while giggling like little school girls. Sadly, the truth is that the full body scanner is probably here to stay, and will eventually become the way all passengers are scanned at the airport. There is no denying that the ability to see right through you and your clothes is the most effective way to scan for weapons or other unwanted items at the airport. Whether this technology will also involve you walking through with your bags is just a matter of time.



Saturday, May 23, 2009


New York City Police Department's Surveillance Helicopter

According to the NYPD, you won't even recognize that its there, but high above the heads of New York City's citizens, there is a $10 million special NYPD helicopter with an impressive arsenal of surveillance equipment inside it. The chopper, called "23", looks like plain helicopter on the outside, but on the inside it is chock-full of hi-tech gadgetry. The helicopter's surveillance cameras,



including one for infrared photography, are mounted below the aircraft. The chopper's arsenal of sophisticated surveillance and tracking equipment is powerful enough to stealthily read license plates - or even pedestrian's faces - from high above. The helicopter's surveillance system can beam live footage to police command centers or even to wireless hand-held devices. Without leaving Manhattan airspace, the chopper also was able to get a crystal-clear picture of jetliners waiting to take off from LaGuardia Airport and to survey Kennedy International Airport's jet fuel lines. The helicopter is just part of the department's efforts to adopt cutting-edge technology for its counterterrorism operations. The NYPD also plans to spend tens of millions of dollars strengthening security in the lower Manhattan business district with a network of closed-circuit television cameras and license-plate readers posted at bridges, tunnels and other entry points.




Laser beam spy camera joins war on terrorism

A laser that can scan a crowd and identify people who have been handling explosives is being secretly tested at British airports and railway stations. The device - no bigger than a shoe box - could also be used by police and MI5 surveillance teams to identify Islamic terrorists outside mosques or community centres. The laser can pick out suspects in large crowds and highlight explosive residue on their clothing and luggage. Professor John Tyrer, of Loughborough University, who helped to develop the equipment, said: “When you handle an explosive, the chemicals -such as Semtex and TNT - leave traces. With this technology we are able to see this telltale residue and identify possible suspects. Using laser technology we can see the explosives on people's clothes, on their hands or on items like backpacks such as those used by the July 7 London bombers.” He added: “This equipment could be carried by surveillance teams or could be set up to monitor a street, a railway, airport terminal or national stadium.” When the equipment scans a crowd, it alerts an operator when explosive particles are detected.


Echelon (Signals Intelligence)

“Trillions of bytes of textual archive and thousands of online users, or gigabytes of live data stream per day that are filtered against tens of thousands of complex interest profiles” Echelon is a system used by the United States National Security Agency (NSA) to intercept and process international communications passing via communications satellites. It is one part of a global surveillance systems that intercept messages from the Internet, from undersea cables, from radio transmissions, from secret equipment installed inside embassies, or use orbiting satellites to monitor signals anywhere on the earth's surface. The system includes stations run by Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, in addition to those operated by the United States. They all form part of the same integrated global network using the same equipment and methods to extract information and intelligence illicitly from millions of messages every day, all over the world. The system works by indiscriminately intercepting very large quantities of communications and using computers to identify and extract messages of interest from the mass of unwanted ones. A chain of secret interception facilities has been established around the world to tap into all the major components of the international telecommunications networks. Some monitor communications satellites, others land-based communications networks, and others radio communications. ECHELON links together all these facilities, providing the US and its allies with the ability to intercept a large proportion of the communications on the planet. The computers at each station in the ECHELON network automatically search through the millions of messages intercepted for ones containing pre-programmed keywords. The thousands of simultaneous messages are read in "real time" as they pour into the station, hour after hour, day after day, as the computer finds intelligence needles in telecommunications haystacks. According to its website, the USA's National Security Agency is "a high technology organization... on the frontiers of communications and data processing". Russia, China, France and other nations also operate worldwide networks. 




Enhanced Driver’s Licenses

Vermont has become the third state to begin issuing enhanced driver’s licenses with radio frequency tags that also serve as official identification cards at U.S. border crossing points. It did so under a program authorized by the Homeland Security Department. The Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles began accepting applications for the enhanced licenses through its Montpelier office. The new card is voluntary and costs $25 more than a standard license. New York, Washington State and British Columbia in Canada offer similar licenses designed to comply with DHS’ Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, which goes into effect in June, 2009. Officials in Arizona, Michigan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec have indicated they intend to issue similar cards. The enhanced drivers licenses have embedded radio frequency identification (RFID) chips that can be scanned at a distance of 20 to 30 feet at U.S. border crossings. The RFID chips in the licenses emit a reference number that must be checked against a DHS database to obtain personal information.


         

CCTV Security Cameras

An explosion proof camera and various dome mounted cameras are pictured above. CCTV is an acronym that stands for Closed Circuit Television. It is defined as the use of one or more cameras used for surveillance purposes. It was initially developed to increase bank security and has since spread to every corner of the security industry. Home security systems, businesses, corporations, organizations, and schools are several examples of locations that implement CCTV Security Systems. They produce high quality, exceptionally sharp color images, and have motion sensors that track movement across an area. They can pick a person out of a crowd and lock on them, tracing their movements; they can run at night because of infrared technology. The possibilities are endless for CCTV, especially as the technology continues to develop.




Surveillance cameras mounted on top of a tall steel pole


170 surveillance cameras on one block! NYC now Camera City. In 2005, the NYCLU counted more than 4,000 street level cameras from the West Village down to Battery Park. The group also found that the 292 cameras along 125th Street in Central Harlem recorded nearly every movement on that busy street. "I would believe the number has dramatically increased" three years later, said Matt Faiella, staff attorney for the NYCLU. The cameras have myriad uses. The NYPD wants to install thousands to protect the city against terrorism. The NYPD's recently released plan to protect the city by installing some 3,000 additional cameras in the city raised concern at the NYCLU because it takes a new step in surveillance by creating a database of license plates and people's movements. The police said the images, including license plate captures, would be erased after 30 days. Because they're continually making new discoveries to increase the effectiveness of surveillance cameras, biometrics, rfid chips, etc., the government may soon be tracking us all.


Biometric Digital Fingerprint Scanner

Biometric technology, requiring digital fingerprints and a photograph for identification, is used by the Department of State to establish and verify the identities of visa applicants at embassies and consulates around the world through its BioVisa program. The Department of Homeland Security established the US-VISIT program under which a traveler’s biometrics are collected in his country, compared against a watch list of known criminals and suspected terrorists, and then verified again upon arrival in the United States. Biometrics are unique and virtually impossible to forge.



Hitachi Finger Vein Scanner

This is a new payment technology brought to us by Hitachi which makes your fingertip pay for transactions. This is a biometric cardless credit payment system, which adopts the uniqueness of the blood vessel patterns in each individual human body as the signature for payment authentication. The new biometric system is able to recognize pattern of the blood vessels in your fingers, so, what you need is to insert your finger for a scan to authenticate the credit card transactions. Blood vessels are hidden under the skin, which aren’t like retinas or fingerprints and shouldn’t be possible to counterfeit. In order for you to use your fingertip for making payment, you need to first register your finger vein pattern with the credit card company. The idea of cardless payment making use finger vein that has lowest counterfeit possibility is definitely good. A few of the common problems such as card loss and theft will be eliminated with this new system.


High Resolution IR Dome Camera

A Vandalproof IR Dome Camera unlike any other. What makes the Hi-Res Sony HAD Vandalproof IR Dome Camera so effective is its tough design. Ideal for indoor or outdoor use, the Hi-Res IR Dome Camera is completely surrounded by a heavy-duty all-metal casing. Surrounding the camera is 24 infrared LED sensors that ensure outstanding image quality at a distance of up to 40 feet in any lighting situation – including near total darkness. The Hi-Res Sony HAD Vandalproof IR Dome Camera is always on guard – day or night – providing high-resolution images straight to a TV or monitor.

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

The Coming Antichrist And The Mark Of The Beast


Short videos on the coming Antichrist and the "Mark of the Beast" System

Friday, November 30, 2007

Total Surveillance


It's everywhere and it's growing. Has the demand for and use of electronic surveillance increased? The rapid changes in telecommunications technology has been accompanied by a growth in the potential intrusiveness of electronic surveillance and a steady increase in government surveillance activity. Surveillance is the monitoring of behavior of people, objects or processes within systems for conformity to expected or desired norms. Although the word surveillance literally means "watching over" the term is often used for all forms of observation or monitoring, not just visual observation. Such as the art of watching over the activities of persons or groups from a position of higher authority. Surveillance may be covert (without a persons knowledge) or overt (perhaps with frequent reminders such as "we are watching over you"). Because they're continually making new discoveries to increase the effectiveness of biometrics, rfid chips, etc., the government may soon be tracking us all.

Wednesday, May 30, 2007

RFID tattoos for tracking cows... and people


Did you know that Saint Louis based Somark Innovations successfully tested an "RFID tattoo" on cows and rats? Yes indeed, tattoo, not the ol' RFID chip found in passports, dogs, and Dutch VIP clubbers. Somark's system uses an array of needles to inject a passive RFID ink which can be read through the hair on your choice of beast. The ink can be either invisible or colored but Somark is keeping mum as to its exact contents. They only say that it doesn't contain any metals and is 100% biocompatible and chemically inert. The tattoo can be applied in 5 to 10 seconds with no shaving involved and can be read from up to 4 feet away -- the bigger the tattoo, the more information stored. Best of it all, it's apparently safe for humans to ingest allowing the FDA to track back Mad Cow Disease, e-coli outbreaks, and Soylent Green. Don't worry, they can't track you just as long as you chew your food like mama taught. However, with "military personnel" listed as Somark's "secondary target market," well, it's just a matter of time before we're all cattle now isn't it.

Cops In Full Riot Gear

Welcome To The New World Order

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Alex Jones
The Alex Jones Show is a nationally syndicated news/talk show based out of Austin, TX. The show is syndicated by the Genesis Communication Network on over 60 AM and FM radio stations across the United States, as well as having a large internet based audience. The show covers everything from implanted microchips to the police state. Listen to Alex Jones live Monday thru Friday from 11:00AM—3:00PM Central. Select from one of these Live Streams to listen to the Alex Jones Show Live or any time to hear each day's show re-broadcast:
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Sunday, May 20, 2007

The Verichip

Total Surveillance. Imagine being forced to receive a signal-emitting microchip that would be implanted beneath your skin containing your personal information and identifiable with a scanner, without which you could neither buy nor sell goods.




VeriChip is a human-implantable RFID (radio frequency identification) device from VeriChip Corporation. The VeriChip is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved human-implantable RFID microchip. VeriChip received United States FDA approval in 2004. About twice the length of a grain of rice, the device is typically implanted above the triceps area of an individual’s right arm. Once scanned at the proper frequency, the VeriChip responds with a unique 16-digit number which can correlate the user to information stored on a database for identity verification, medical records access and other uses. The insertion procedure is performed under local anesthetic and once inserted, is invisible to the naked eye. The process can easily be performed in a physician’s office.
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Saturday, May 19, 2007

Biometric Technology

Before long, we may use fingerprints, iris scans, and voice recognition to log onto computers, buy groceries -- even when picking up kids from school. This could be you: At a convenience store, a scanner reads your fingerprints and deducts the price of a coffee and doughnut from your checking account. Once at the office, your employer uses software to monitor the rhythm of your typing or a Webcam to measure the proportions of your face before letting you onto the network. Your call to customer service won't go through until you're identified by the cadence of your voice.




Palm Reader
What: Fujitsu PalmSecure Measures: Vascular patterns and blood flow in the hand
Status: Widely available at ATMs and other locations in Japan. U.S. launch expected this year The PalmSecure bombards the user's hand with "near infrared" light to detect the pattern of blood vessels. Fujitsu is close-lipped about a U.S. debut expected later this year but says PalmSecure could be useful in health care and for granting access to buildings.



Let Your Fingers Do the Paying
What: Pay By Touch Measures: Fingerprints Status: available in certain grocery stores. Soon through an as-yet-undisclosed e-tailer Sample customers: Supervalu, Albertson's, Piggly Wiggly. Used by several retailers, Pay By Touch may be the most prominent biometric device in the U.S. Shoppers enrolled in the program can speed through checkout lines, paying for items with a linked bank account or credit card simply by applying a fingerprint to a sensor. Pay By Touch says more than 2 million people have signed up. Now the company plans to expand into online retail, using sensors available on some laptops.
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Friday, May 18, 2007

Rfid Technology


RFID Label MPI Label Company | Alien chip | 96-bit



RFID tag UPM RAFLATAC | ShortDipole (ETSI) 96-bit Gen2 UHF



RFID tag UPM RAFLATAC | Frog DualDipole 96-bit Gen2 UHF



RFID tag UPM RAFLATAC | MiniDipole 96-bit Gen2 UHF



Implantable RFID chips RFID, Inc | used for animal tracking


Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. An RFID tag is an object that can be attached to or incorporated into a product, animal, or person for the purpose of identification using radio waves. All RFID tags contain at least two parts. One is an integrated circuit for storing and processing information, modulating and demodulating a radio frequency (RF) signal and perhaps other specialized functions. The second is an antenna for receiving and transmitting the signal. The RFID tag can automatically be read from several meters away and does not have to be in the line of sight of the reader. The current thrust in RFID use in supply chain management for large enterprises. RFID increases the speed and accuracy with which inventory can be tracked and managed thereby saving money for the business.
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