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Tue, Sep 6th - 3:30AM

Inspecting Your Gas Furnace

Inspection of Gas-fired Forced-air Furnaces will prolong your life expectancy. Two Most Common Types of furnaces are the High-efficiency and Standard-efficiency Natural Gas Furnace. They are usually either up-draft or down-draft models. Up-draft is by far the most common.

Over the last 20 years, a new generation of higher efficiency gas furnaces and boilers has come to market. An essential difference in the design of these units is how they are vented, eliminating the need for dilution air. The combustion of gas produces certain by-products, including water vapour and carbon dioxide.

In a conventional gas furnace, such by-products are vented through a chimney, but a considerable amount of heat (both in the combustion products and in heated room air) escapes through the chimney at the same time. Heat is also lost up the chimney when the furnace is off.

AFUE rating of furnace is the estimated energy efficiency rating of the furnace based on one year. The high efficiency furnace will actually produce heat at a cooler temperature than conventional furnace due to the fact that more heat is extracted from combustion which is why the need for a chimney is eliminated.

Natural Gas Furnace Components which are inspected during home inspection or service call. The typical Natural Gas furnaces are comprised of a cabinet, distribution system, heat exchanger, fan and controls and a thermostat. There are many additions that can be added to a gas furnace which include, humidifiers, air cleaners and HRV's.

Standard Inspection Steps performed by a Typical Home Inspector will include these four basic inspection steps:

1. Remove burner and fan cover with power turned off. 2. Check the heat exchanger. 3. Start the furnace and inspecting flame, exhaust system. 4. Check the duct system and air flow through ducts and return air systems.

Life Expectancies of Furnaces

20 to 25 years is the average life expectancy of a furnace. Failure of heat exchanger typically means the furnace will be replaced.

Regular service and maintenance can greatly extend the life of your furnace and some furnaces will last over 35 years.


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Tue, Sep 6th - 3:27AM

Landscaping and Your Home Garden

Landscape planning is a branch of landscape architecture. Urban park systems and greenways of the type planned by Frederick Law Olmsted are key examples of urban landscape planning. Landscape designers tend to work for clients who wish to commission construction work. Landscape planners can look beyond the 'closely drawn technical limits' and 'narrowly drawn territorial boundaries' which constrain design projects. Landscape planners tend to work on projects which: are of broad geographical scope; concern many land uses or many clients; are implemented over a long period of time. In rural areas, the damage caused by unplanned mineral extraction was one of the early reasons for a public demand for landscape planning.

Landscape architecture is the design of outdoor and public spaces to achieve environmental, socio-behavioral, and/or aesthetic outcomes. It involves the systematic investigation of existing social, ecological, and geological conditions and processes in the landscape, and the design of interventions that will produce the desired outcome. The scope of the profession includes: urban design; site planning; town or urban planning; environmental restoration; parks and recreation planning; visual resource management; green infrastructure planning and provision; and private estate and residence landscape master planning and design; all at varying scales of design, planning and management. A practitioner in the profession of landscape architecture is called a landscape architect.

Horticulture is the industry and science of plant cultivation including the process of preparing soil for the planting of seeds, tubers, or cuttings.[1] Horticulturists work and conduct research in the disciplines of plant propagation and cultivation, crop production, plant breeding and genetic engineering, plant biochemistry, and plant physiology. The work involves fruits, berries, nuts, vegetables, flowers, trees, shrubs, and turf. Horticulturists work to improve crop yield, quality, nutritional value, and resistance to insects, diseases, and environmental stresses. Horticulture usually refers to gardening on a smaller scale, while agriculture refers to the large-scale cultivation of crops.

Floriculture crops include bedding plants, flowering plants, foliage plants or houseplants, cut cultivated greens, and cut flowers. As distinguished from nursery crops, floriculture crops are generally herbaceous. Bedding and garden plants consist of young flowering plants (annuals and perennials) and vegetable plants. They are grown in cell packs (in flats or trays), in pots, or in hanging baskets, usually inside a controlled environment, and sold largely for gardens and landscaping. Geraniums, impatiens, and petunias are the best-selling bedding plants. Chrysanthemums are the major perennial garden plant in the United States.

Most plants thrive in moist, but well drained soil. Sounds contradictory, right? But it simply means soil that retains moisture and doesn't stay too wet. Ideal garden soil has the texture of crumbly chocolate cake and is easy to dig. The way to improve almost any kind of soil - from sticky clay to porous sandy soil - is actually the same. You add hummus (composted manure, compost or leaf mould, or a combination of them).

There really is no final choice, since gardens are never finished, but try to be as realistic as you can. Sketching it out on graph paper first, can help you to visualize how your garden will look. This may be the best route to go, but many gardens would never get planted if we waited until we felt things were perfect and it can be hard for a new gardener to equate what's on paper with reality. Sometimes you just have to get started. You'll learn as you go. Just make sure that most of your plant choices fit of the criteria you've outlined and the growing conditions you have to offer. Try not to squeeze in too many different plants and you're small space garden should look and grow just fine.


Barrie Home Inspector

Orillia Home Inspector

Alliston Home Inspector

Barrie Home Inspections

Barrie Hair Salon

Barrie Thermal Imaging and Infrared Scans

Barrie Real Estate Agents

Brookfield Dnd Irp Relocation Info

Midland Home Inspector

Midland Cottage Inspector

Bon Meditation Center

Toronto Commercial & Industrial Building Inspections

Toronto - Barrie Commercial Property Inspector

Barrie Home Inspections

Comment (0)


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