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Mon, Sep 5th - 4:02PM

Choosing Doors for Your Home

When selecting doors for energy efficiency, it's important to first consider their energy-performance ratings in relation to the local climate and home's design. This will help narrow the selection. New exterior doors often fit and insulate better than older types. If there are older doors in the home, replacing them might be a good investment for the homeowner, resulting in lower heating and cooling costs. If your client is building a new home, they might consider buying the most energy-efficient doors possible.

One common type of exterior door has a steel skin with a polyurethane foam-insulation core. It usually includes a magnetic strip (similar to a refrigerator door's magnetic seal) as weatherstripping. If installed correctly and if the door is not bent, this type of door needs no further weatherstripping. The R-values of most steel and fiberglass-clad entry doors range from R-5 to R-6 (not including the effects of a window). For example, a 1-inch (3.81 cm) thick door without a window offers more than five times the insulating value of a solid wood door of the same size.

Weatherstripping to seal air leaks around movable joints, such as windows and doors, can be used in an energy-efficient home. To determine how much weatherstripping is needed, add the perimeters of all windows and doors to be weatherstripped, and then add 5% to 10% to accommodate any waste. Also consider that weatherstripping comes in varying depths and widths. Before applying weatherstripping in an existing home, the homeowner will need to do the following (if they haven't already): detect air leaks; and assess the ventilation needs for indoor air quality.

A product for each specific location should be chosen. Felt and open-cell foams tend to be inexpensive, susceptible to weather, visible, and inefficient at blocking air flow. However, the ease of applying these materials may make them valuable in low-traffic areas. Vinyl, which is slightly more expensive, holds up well and resists moisture. Metals (bronze, copper, stainless steel and aluminum) last for years and are affordable. Metal weatherstripping can also provide a nice touch to older homes where vinyl might seem out of place.

"Double-hung" windows are the most common traditional window. They have an upper sash and a lower sash, both of which slide up and down in the window opening. "Single-hung" windows operate the same as "double-hung" windows, but their upper sash is fixed in place. By virtue of being stationary and permanently secured, single-hungs are often more energy efficient that double-hung windows depending on the type and style. Most vertical operators (single- and double-hungs) now feature "tilt-in" sashes for cleaning of the exterior surfaces. The industry moved towards this approach for service and replacement reasons as well as accessibility to the exterior from the inside of the home. Casement windows are hinged on one side and are typically operated using an interior hand crank. Awning and Basement windows hinge on top and bottom respectively. Sliding windows, or "sliders", are sometimes used in openings that are wider than they are tall.

Low-E is a film that is several layers of metal poured microscopically thin over the surface of newly poured glass. This heat reflective film is transparent but can be darker or lighter depending on the type and manufacturer. This data is rated in Visible Light Transmission. Darker glass with heavier Low - E will have less VT. The NFRC rates most energy star rated window manufacturers.

The Barrie Home Inspector offer Free thermal imaging of your home which is included with your home inspection. Thermal Imaging will find any air or moisture leaking around your windows.

Looking to find the best deal on Barrie Home Inspections, then visit Home Maintenance Tips by the Barrie Home Inspector to find the best advice on protecting your home.


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Mon, Sep 5th - 3:59PM

Thermal Imaging and Your Home Inspection
Thermal imaging is the use of light rays that are invisible to the naked eye. There is an infinite range of light that is invisible to the naked eye. The wave lengths of light that are invisible to the naked eye are actually quite small. All light is identified by its wave length, frequency and energy. Humans can only see light in the 400 to 750 nanometer range. Some animals can see light in the infrared spectrum and you can buy infrared film for you regular camera. An example of low-energy light rays is radio waves which are typically described by their frequency. A prism placed into a ray of sunshine in a dark room reflects the colours of the rainbow using a property known as dispersion. This is the method Sir William Herschel utilized in the 1800's in conjunction with thermometers to discern the presence of invisible light rays. He called his discovery the thermometric spectrum later to be known as infrared. Infrared thermography provides the most rapid means by which to identify unintentional air leakage pathways in a building envelope, although it cannot quantify the leakage rate.

The benefits of employing infrared thermography in buildings are:-

1. Testing building envelope for leaks prior to covering thus saving time and money.

2. Finding ares of air or moisture penetration which may cause damage or failure to the building products.

3. By identifying air leakage pathways the potential for these areas to allow in rain water or moisture is also identified and can be protected.

4. Energy audits use a blower door to create under-pressure conditions during the audit. The thermal camera can be used to identify air movement through un-sealed pathways.

The Barrie Home Inspector was the first company to use Thermal Imaging technology in Simcoe County.


Barrie Home Inspector

Orillia Home Inspector

Alliston Home Inspector

Barrie Home Inspections

Barrie Hair Salon

Barrie Thermal Imaging and Infrared Scans

Barrie Real Estate Agents

Brookfield Dnd Irp Relocation Info

Midland Home Inspector

Midland Cottage Inspector

Toronto Commercial & Industrial Building Inspections

Toronto - Barrie Commercial Property Inspector

Barrie Home and Property Inspector/a>

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Mon, Sep 5th - 3:53PM

Protect Your Home with Caulking

Caulking has many uses and can also refer to the application of flexible sealing compounds to close up gaps in buildings and other structures against water, air, dust, insects, or as a component in firestopping. In the tunnelling industry, caulking refers to the sealing of joints in segmental precast concrete tunnels, commonly by using concrete.

Although not a high-tech operation, caulking can be tricky. The instructions on the compound cartridge should be followed. The following are a few important tips to provide your client:

Common tools are a pointing tool, shaped wood, wet finger or a spoon. Detergent should not be added to the moisture for tooling, since it may drip onto the bond surface, causing a loss of adhesion. For neat work, the worker may apply painter's masking tape beforehand, taping off the areas on each side of the joint to catch any surplus, and remove the tape again before the tooling time has expired. To prevent three-sided adhesion or to avoid sagging in wide, deep joints, a backer rod made of plastic foam can be pressed into the gap before caulking. After removing old caulking ensure joint is clean and debris free. Allow the cleaned joint to dry for a day or more unless the product is approved for wet applications. Press an open-cell foam backer rod into joints wider than 1/4 inch (6 mm) or deeper than 1/2 inch (12 mm) so the joint is about half as deep as it is wide. Never fill a deep joint. Doing so wastes caulk and makes a good, permanent bond less likely.

Caulking compounds can also be found in aerosol cans, squeeze tubes, and ropes for small jobs or special applications. Water-based caulk can be cleaned with water, while solvent-based compounds require a solvent for cleanup. Caulking compounds also vary in strength, properties, and prices.

Silicone caulk is the type of caulk that people tend to be most familiar with. It is usually clear in color and has a rubbery, flexible texture when dry. For the past 20 years or so, the majority of caulks on the market have been made out of silicone. Because of its durability and effectiveness on a wide variety of surfaces, silicone continues to be a popular choice today. It is especially useful on non-porous surfaces, including metal and plastic. And because it stays flexible after it is dry, silicone caulk rarely breaks or cracks as a result of extreme temperatures or rapid temperature changes. This makes it perfect for filling gaps around windows and doors.

During every home inspection in Barrie, Alliston or Orillia we inspect all exterior caulking to ensure there are no cracks or missing caulking.


Barrie Home Inspector

Orillia Home Inspector

Alliston Home Inspector

Barrie Home Inspections

Barrie Hair Salon

Barrie Thermal Imaging and Infrared Scans

Barrie Real Estate Agents

Brookfield Dnd Irp Relocation Info

Midland Home Inspector

Midland Cottage Inspector

Bon Meditation Center

Toronto Commercial & Industrial Building Inspections

Toronto - Barrie Commercial Property Inspector

Barrie Home and Property Inspector/a>

Comment (0)


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