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    In regards to your comment on encouraging women to carry .357 Magnums, I must strenuously disagree with your suggestion. As an employee of a large retail firearms store, whose job entails giving recommendations and advice for new shooters, I can only describe your suggestion as unreasonable and foolish.

    Can women shoot .357 Magnum? Yes. Is it an effective cartridge for self defense? Yes. However, that ignores the more important aspects of choosing a weapon for self-defense. Far more important than caliber is confidence and skill with the weapon, and the consequent ability to hit the target. The best way to learn how to shoot is to practice frequently with a lightly-recoiling firearm, until one's confidence and accuracy improve.

    While a .357 Magnum can shoot .38 Special ammunition (which is indeed a suitable round for target practice and learning), your article shows no sign that you recognize or understand the difference between the two cartridges. Stated plainly: while a .357 HANDGUN can be used for learning and practice, .357 Magnum AMMUNITION is a horrible choice for beginning shooters.

    Furthermore, the picture attached to the article is of a larger-frame S&W revolver. Such a handgun is almost completely useless for concealed carry, as it weighs several pounds and would be virtually impossible for most women to conceal (even inside of a purse). On the contrary, a small snub-nosed revolver in .38 Special makes for a very popular, easy to carry weapon that women have successfully carried and defended themselves with for decades.

    Considering how far off base your suggestions for selecting a weapon are, one must wonder how accurate the rest of your statements are.
    2008-04-09 10:39:36 Posted by Wes Janson ()

    I suppose you think a 9mm glock would be better? Even though a glock has comparatively little stopping power. Everyone has a different opinion on which gun is best.

    Its not like we were suggesting a .50 calibre desert eagle. That would have been overkill.
    2008-04-09 10:44:05 Posted by Suzy ()

    Many of the other articles are your site provide references, to books and online, that corroborate your opinions and base. While the laws between the United States and Canada are certainly different, The premise of citing work that you are basing criticism on is important. While you are completely entitled to disagree with anything that is posted in print or the web, it is courteous to correctly cite that information from which you have derived your opinions. The article in question implies to have been sourced from the NRA, but it does not come directly from them.

    There are many points in your article that are valid, but there are also many point that your audience deserves to research for themselves.
    2008-04-09 10:56:42 Posted by Gregory Bazydlo (b azydlogs@gmail.com)

    Well then they can certainly go research it themselves if they desire to. We didn't feel it was necessary for an opinion piece.

    We fully endorse people to make their own decisions.
    2008-04-09 11:00:28 Posted by Suzy ()

    Indeed, the Glock in 9mm (either the G19 or the G26) is an extremely popular and well-suited for self-defense. I couldn't begin to estimate how many men and women I've met who chose it as a beginning firearm, and for whom it worked extremely well. As a matter of fact, my mother carries a Glock 19 for personal protection.

    While everyone does have differing opinions, every single credentialed instructor will tell you that shot placement is more important than caliber. Being able to hit the target with a 9mm consistently and confidently is far, far, far better than missing with a .357 Magnum (unless your goal is to promote women missing their attackers).

    As for the Desert Eagle...having sold and shot them, I can honestly state that for an inexperienced shooter (male or female), both the .50 AE Desert Eagle and a smaller .357 Magnum will be uncontrollable and highly uncomfortable. By uncontrollable, I mean "pretty unlikely to hit the target" and by uncomfortable I mean "hurts too much to shoot more than one or two rounds".
    2008-04-09 11:04:57 Posted by Wes Janson ()

    Valid point. Training is certainly a necessity when using any of the aforementioned handguns.

    For some reason I don't think any women will notice any pain in their hands from firing the .357 because they will be too high on adrenaline and scared that they will simply ignore the pain.

    However there is another big deterrent. Confidence.

    Statistically (sorry I can't cite the source off the top of my head) rapists go after women who lack confidence and appears like an easy target. A woman who struts around confidently with ANY gun in her pocket is immediately more unlikely to be a target.

    I can't imagine why your mother still lives in fear of rapists. Thieves maybe.
    2008-04-09 11:13:21 Posted by Suzy ()

    That is certainly true. Confidence *whether female OR male* is the difference that prevents MANY crimes. Weapons in and of themselves are merely tools. It is the training and mindset of the individual holding that weapon that dictates the use of the weapon. Those who go out of their way to obtain appropriate safety and defense training will be more confident in themselves in ALL situations.

    To your point that they will ignore the pain due to adrenaline may be true to some extent, but it is important that they practice with that weapon to gain the proficiency and confidence with their weapon. THAT is why the smaller caliber is usually recommended for beginning shooters.
    2008-04-09 11:23:19 Posted by Gregory Bazydlo ()

    That is certainly true. Confidence *whether female OR male* is the difference that prevents MANY crimes. Weapons in and of themselves are merely tools. It is the training and mindset of the individual holding that weapon that dictates the use of the weapon. Those who go out of their way to obtain appropriate safety and defense training will be more confident in themselves in ALL situations.

    To your point that they will ignore the pain due to adrenaline may be true to some extent, but it is important that they practice with that weapon to gain the proficiency and confidence with their weapon. THAT is why the smaller caliber is usually recommended for beginning shooters.
    2008-04-09 11:24:13 Posted by Gregory Bazydlo ()

    You're right-in a life-or-death situation, they're not going to notice the pain. However, if it hurts to shoot, they're not going to practice with it, and if they don't practice they won't have confidence.

    I've met a number of people who have guns (including some cops), but because they don't practice they show no particular confidence in their own abilities. I've also met people who carry what might be considered as "weak" pocket pistols, who have such a level of training and confidence that I have absolutely no doubt they can adequately defend themselves.

    My mother doesn't really fear rapists or thieves, but rather keeps a gun as a form of insurance-just in case. I've known people for years and years before ever finding out that they quietly carry a weapon every day..not out of fear, but simply to be prepared.

    In my line of work, I sometimes have customers relate how they were attacked or threatened, and defended themselves without ever firing a shot. It doesn't make the news, and doesn't get talked about, but for every one of those people it most certainly did matter.
    2008-04-09 11:33:05 Posted by Wes Janson ()

    You know Charles Moffat has a great story about how he was over in South Korea and met one of the American soldiers who were stationed over there at the airport. They sat down in the airport lounge and had a beer together, and while they didn't agree with everything the other person said, they both respected each other's opinions and choices. "To each his own," said the soldier at one point, who was going home to Alaska after a successful tour of duty to sign up for the coast guard.

    In this case however I think important point is that while our opinions may differ, its "To each HER own" for making the choice as to whether to carry a weapon, seek martial arts training, take up boxing or whatever.

    I'm certain that any woman reading our article, who goes into a gun shop to consider purchasing a .357 Magnum will automatically get a 2nd opinion from the guy or girl across the counter, and then they will make their own choice.
    2008-04-09 12:40:57 Posted by Suzy ()

    typed too fast: the important point
    2008-04-09 12:42:36 Posted by Suzy ()

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    2011-04-20 14:13:22 Posted by April 2008 ()

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